HIDDEN GEMS IN ALBERTA

HIDDEN GEMS IN ALBERTA

We are all suffering from the confines of the COVID-19 virus and the best we can hope for is a driving vacation. We have a number of suggestions for you with this illustrated road guide to hidden gems of Alberta.

HEAD SMASHED IN BUFFALO JUMP

 

A Unesco World Heritage Site nestled in the heart of the Porcupine Hills in SW Alberta. 7000 years of Blackfoot First Nation history comes to life in the museum built into the cliffs of this historical site. 

Situated a short drive, NW of  Fort Macleod on highway #785

BROOKS AQUEDUCT

 

Situated a few kilometres SE of the town of Brooks, lies the remains of an irrigation system built by the Canadian Pacific Railway.

Construction began in 1912 and was completed in 1914, making this structure over one hundred years old. Spanning a shallow valley, the structure is 3.2 kilometres long, and stands 20 metres high. At the time it was the largest concrete structure in the world. 

THE VILLAGE OF ROSEBUD

 

Nestled in the rolling prairie hills of Southern Alberta lies a small community that is reminiscent of a bygone era.

For anybody who has read W.O. Mitchel’s book – ‘Who Has Seen the Wind’, there is a sense of familiarity to the mood of this community.  Life seems slower, the gusts of wind seem to whisper in your ears, and there is no rush to get anywhere. It’s a great place to spend a weekend at one of the B&B’s, and  leave your worries behind you.

MEDICINE HAT & CYPRESS HILLS

 

Situated in the SE corner of Alberta along the Trans Canada highway (#1), sits the city of Medicine Hat. It’s a sun worshippers paradise with the most sunny days in Canada, and one of the mildest winters to be found in the country.

It’s large enough to have all the amenities, but small enough to have  small community charm. The Medalta Museum is a reminder that during the 19th and early 20th century, Medicine Hat was home to a thriving ceramics industry, thanks largely to the clay from the surrounding bluffs and hills along the South Saskatchewan river.

It was and still is, home to a large number of Blackfoot First Nations people, who have a long and rich history in the area. The Saamis Teepee is a reminder of this historical link that the city has with the First Nations People.

Nearby Cypress Hills Provincial Park is a unique geological feature,  rising 600 metres from the surrounding prairies, it offers a variety of recreational pursuits in all seasons. The views are impressive as well!